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28.7.05

hey ladies....

Pam-b

inspired by o at home's "women who make beautiful things" section (it's a fantastic section), i decided to install a permanent feature on d*s: hey ladies...

CAB25CLL

this (weekly or bi-weekly) section will feature a talented female designer whose work deserves both celebration and in-depth discussion. in an industry dominated by men (i'll be dealing mainly with product and graphic design...), i think these successful women deserve to be noticed, commended and applauded for their wonderful work.

CAPK4RL9

today i want to focus on pamela sunday, a brooklyn-based designer whose sculpture is carried throughout new york. formerly an art director, ms. sunday discovered her passion for clay over 10 years ago. while working in world of fashion advertising, she decided the time was right to follow her heart, so she left fashion for design and hasn't looked back since. for the past 10 years she's been creating beautiful, one of a kind, hand built ceramics from her carroll gardens studio that reflect her interest in texture and form. what i love most about ms. sunday's work is its clear interest in and focus on surface texture and organic shapes. her sculptures remind me of shapes and textures found underwater- her pieces are wonderfully reminiscent of both prickly sea urchins and star fish, with textures and patterns recalling coral and plant life.

Burst,Blastoid,Sprocket

ms. sunday's work is an oasis of in-your-face texture in a world of jonathan adler-ish smooth perfection. while it may not be for everyone- it's certainly more intense than a lot of the ceramics i've seen in most people's houses (and some of the textures give even me the willies)- i think it has a very specific audience that will appreciate the exploration into form and its relationship to texture and surface. you can find ms. sunday's work at karkula in nyc (68 gansvoort street), regeneration furniture, the jason lamberth gallery in the hamptons (103 hayground rd., water mill, ny) and belvedere in atlanta. thank you, pamela for passing along your work- it's wonderful to see what the brooklyn women around me are up to...

Granuloid

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10 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

ooooooh i like!

10:26 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

like the spikey ones. very nice! she seems like a cool kinda girl.

10:28 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Great idea to focus on female designers!

1:58 PM  
Blogger misocrazy said...

i've been following your awesome blog for a long time. great grrl power idea! thanks for all the inspiration.

3:39 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i'd love to check out more of oprah's "women who make beautiful things" but can't find them online anywhere?? help!

5:13 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

what a lovely idea! women should be highlighted and recognized even if they are lost in pages of design text books. someone needs to showcase our beautiful talents!

9:13 AM  
Blogger design*sponge said...

unfortunately oprah's women section isn't online, but you can see it in each issue. the summer 2005 issue is on stands now. it's great.

i'm glad everyone responded so well to the idea of a women-centered post every week (or two weeks), it's something i've wanted to do for a while.

d*s

9:54 AM  
Blogger velocitygirl said...

thanks for this great post and for making a space for highlighting women in design! I saw Ms Sunday's work in NY recently and fell in love with it. So organic, original, and fabulous! reminds me of all the beautiful textured shapes I saw under the microscope in microbiology class. look forward to seeing more great work by women in design!

12:08 PM  
Anonymous a friend said...

this is the most inspired work in the ceramic world being created today.
the passion poured into each piece is blinding.

3:59 AM  
Anonymous Elise said...

i think this is a really exciting site. I love how you've really personalised it. Keep it up... you're a winner

11:12 PM  

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